keep pet healthy

4 great tips to keep your pet healthy

Keep your Furry Friend Healthy and Happy with these 4 Tips

Having a pet is like having a furry member of the family. We give them food, shelter, toys, and they love us back. But, like their owners, each animal has different needs. There are, however, a few things that every pet has in common, whether it meows, neighs, or barks. These 4 tips will help you keep any furry friend healthy and happy.

Overall Health
The #1 way to keep your furry friend healthy is to make sure it has all of its vaccinations. All different types of animals require different vaccines. Some, like heartworm, are common to all animals, but have different dosages depending on weight and species. The best way to ensure that your pet is properly vaccinated is to visit your vet.

Food and Nutrition
Another way to keep your pet as healthy and happy as possible is to make sure he or she is getting proper nutrition. Talking about your pet’s age and activity level with your vet will help you and your vet make sure your fuzzy friend gets the right balance of nutrients he or she needs. Equally important to getting proper nutrition is making sure your pet is at a healthy weight.  Just like humans, weighing your pet regularly serves as important health indicator of your pet’s health.  Overweight or a sudden weight decrease can be a sign of a serious underlying health issue for your pet.  It is recommended to weigh your pet at least twice a month.  EZ Vet pet weight kiosk offers a free pet weight analysis making weighing your pet easy and convenient.

Activity and Exercise
A third tip for keeping your furry friend healthy is proper exercise. All pets, big or small, need exercise. The type of exercise depends on the type of pet. For example, in dogs, exercise helps stimulate their minds, which helps avoid boredom and destructive behaviors. Cats need imaginary prey to chase and stalk as well as scratching posts. Regardless of what kind of furry friend you have, exercise will keep your pet trim and fit, both mentally and physically.

Check for Disease
Keep an eye out for ear mites and other illnesses. They are a common problem for cats and dogs especially. If your pet is constantly shaking its head or scratching its ears, then he or she might have ear mites. These can be spread from animal to animal, and may require being thoroughly cleaned out before medication is prescribed. Check for any irregular behavior that could indicate disease.

Every human life is enriched by having an animal companion. From the unconditional love they give us, to the constant support, the benefits of having a pet are tremendous. Following these 4 tips, and regular visits to the vet, will guarantee that you and your pet have a long and happy life together.

 

Pet Health News- Protect your pet

In many parts of the U.S. temperatures are climbing above 90 degrees, with heat indexes projected into the triple digits, there are no signs of letting up any time soon.

You may think it’s hot, but for your furry friends it could be very dangerous!

For pets, the heat can stress their ability to control their body temperature. In extreme cases, pets can suffer brain damage, fatal heat stroke or suffocate. Yet, there are some ways owners can reduce heat stress.

TIPS TO KEEP PET SAFE

  • Avoid activity during the heat of the day
  • Avoid asphalt – Ensure pets have access to plenty of water
  • Spray down pets that are struggling with heat
  • Never leave pets unattended in a parked car for any period of time

On warm days, temperatures inside a vehicle can easily exceed 120 degrees in a matter of minutes, even when the windows are partially open.

Some animals suffer under the summer sun itself, though. Pet owners should look out for the following symptoms of heat stress:

  • Lethargy
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Dark red gums

 EZ Vet is your companion to a healthy pet!

 

Pet traveling tips for planes, trains or ships

The following tips will help ensure that your pet travels safely, whether it be by train, ship, or airplane.

Traveling by ship

With the exception of assistance dogs, only a few cruise lines accept pets -and usually on ocean crossings only. Some lines permit pets in private cabins, but mostly they are confined to kennels. Contact cruise lines in advance to find out their policies and which of their ships have kennel facilities. If you must use the ship’s kennel, make sure it is protected from the elements.

Traveling by train

Amtrak currently does not accept pets unless they are assistance dogs.

(There may be smaller U.S. railroad companies that permit animals on board.) Many trains in European countries allow pets. Generally, it is the passengers’ responsibility to feed and exercise their pets at station stops.

To ensure a smooth trip for you and your pet, follow the guidelines suggested below for traveling by airplane.

Traveling by airplane

The HSUS recommends that you do not transport your pet by air unless absolutely necessary. If your pet must travel in the cargo hold, you can increase the chances of a safe flight for your pet by following these tips.

 Hope you find these tips helplful.

EZ Vet is your companion to a healthy pet!

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Do you know your dog breeds? American Eskimo Dog

Featured Breed- American Eskimo Dog

A small to medium-size  Nordic-type dog, the American Eskimo Dog is known for its bright white coat,  jet black points (lips, nose and eye rims) and erect triangular ears. Although  once used as a circus dog, they are primarily companion dogs today and  participate in conformation, obedience and agility competitions. The breed’s  white double coat consists of a short, dense undercoat, with longer guard hairs  forming an outer coat that stands off from the body.

American Eskimo dog          american-eskimo-dog

 

Healthy Weight for : Miniature Breed

Adult (7 months- 8 years):    Male: 11-20 lbs.                Female: 11-20 lbs.

Puppy (1-6 months):              Male:  8.25-15 lbs             Female: 8.25-15 lbs.

Geriatric (over 8 years):        Male:   11.55-21 lbs.          Female: 11.55- 21 lbs.

 

Healthy Weight for : Standard Breed

Adult (7 months- 8 years):    Male: 20-40 lbs.               Female: 20-40 lbs.

Puppy (1-6 months):               Male: 15-30 lbs                Female: 15-30 lbs.

Geriatric (over 8 years):         Male: 21-42 lbs.               Female: 21-42 lbs.

 

Healthy Weight for : Toy Breed

Adult (7 months- 8 years):      Male: 6-10 lbs.               Female:  6-10 lbs.

Puppy (1-6 months):                 Male: 4.5-7.5 lbs           Female: 4.5-7.5 lbs.

Geriatric (over 8 years):           Male:  6.3-10.5 lbs.       Female: 6.3- 10.5 lbs.

 

Visit an EZ Vet kiosk regularly to monitor your pet’s weight and health.

 

 

Tips to keep your dog safe this July 4th

dogs fireworks

More pets are lost on Independence Day than any other day. Here are some tips for keeping your dog safe!

1.) Go for a long walk before celebrating. If you normally take your dog out for thirty minutes, take a two-hour hike instead! You want your dog to be completely exhausted. This way his brain will be so tired that he won’t be able to concentrate on the fireworks.

2.) Use canine-safe ear plugs. It is natural for dogs to be afraid of loud noises. The sounds trigger their nervous system, and they may become nervous, afraid, unsure, or shy. Running away from the noise is a survival mechanism. If you can block the noise, it may curb the “flight” response.

3.) Distract your dog. Once the fireworks go off, ask him to do obedience behavior, put him on the treadmill, or strap on his backpack. This helps him focus on something other than the noise.

4.) Involve your dog’s nose. Scents such as lavender or pine can help encourage your dog to relax.

5.) Maintain calm and assertive energy. Don’t feel sorry or frustrated. Don’t blame the fireworks or the people setting them off. These negative emotions will just feed your dog’sanxiety; it won’t help the situation!

6.) Keep your dog on a leash. This will give you more control and help you prevent your dog from running off.

7.) Make sure your dog has I.D. If your dog does become lost, tags and microchips can get him back to you safely. You may also want to consider investing in a device that allows you to locate your dog immediately, like Global Pet Finder.

8.) Be proactive! If you learn that your dog is nervous around fireworks, start preparing now for next year. I recommend that you begin conditioning your dog to be comfortable with these loud sounds at least three months in advance. Don’t wait until Independence Day to introduce your dog to the loud sounds associated with fireworks. Download the sounds of firecrackers, pistols, and other loud noises, and allow your dog to hear them at a low volume while he’s eating, walking, sleeping, and watching TV with you. Gradually increase the volume each day until your dog is comfortable with the sounds at the highest level. I also recommend that you introduce the scent of fireworks to your dog, so he becomes comfortable with that. It’s a simple process, but it takes time. Don’t wait until the last minute to do something about it, and next year it will be a walk in the park!

Deadly Diet- Surprising foods you should never feed your pet

If you are like many dog owners, you may find tableside begging one of the hardest habits to break in your pet. Who can resist those big puppy dog eyes pleading for just a nibble from your plate? You should know, however, that some foods should never be shared with your dog. Some foods contain ingredients and compounds that can do more than cause a minor upset stomach; they can actually be deadly for your dog.  Here are the worst culprits you will want to avoid sharing with your furry friend:

Grapes and Raisins Although the exact toxin is unknown, grapes and raisins have been associated with kidney failure in dogs. Symptoms of grape or raisin exposure include vomiting, lethargy or diarrhea within 12 hours of ingestion. Dogs become increasingly lethargic and dehydrated, and death can occur within three to four days, so extreme care must be taken to ensure your dog never has access to grapes or raisins.

Xylitol Found in some candies and chewing gum, xylitol is a sweetener that can be deadly for your dog. When ingested, xylitol stimulates the release of insulin which can lead to hypoglycemia. Vomiting, lethargy and trouble with coordination are warning signs that should not be ignored; if left untreated, xylitol toxicity can be fatal.

Alcohol Alcoholic beverages can have the same effect on a dog as a human, but most dog breeds are smaller than the average human, making the effects much more acute. Vomiting, liver damage and brain damage can result from even a small amount of alcohol, so use care when consuming alcohol around your pet and dispose of cans and bottles safely.

Apple Core/Apricot Pits The core and pits of these fruits contain cyanogenic glycosides, which can cause cyanide poisoning in dogs. Signs of toxicity include excess salivation, dilated pupils, difficulty breathing, dizziness, collapse, coma, seizures and shock.

Avocado Avocados are toxic to a number of animals, and that includes the family dog. The toxicity comes from a compound called persin, which is found inside the avocado as well as in its skin. There are reports of damage to the heart of some dogs that have ingested sufficient quantities of avocado. The best advice is to avoid feeding your dog avocado altogether.

Chocolate, Coffee, Caffeine These foods all contain methylxanthines, which can cause vomiting, diarrhea, panting, excessive thirst and urination, hyperactivity, abnormal heart rhythm, tremors, seizures and even death. As a general rule, the darker the chocolate, the more toxic it is to pets, with powdered cocoa and dark baking chocolate being the most deadly.

Dairy Products Milk and other dairy products, though not dangerously toxic, cannot be properly digested by adult dogs because they lack the enzyme to break down lactose, the sugar found in dairy. This can lead to excess gas and diarrhea.

Macadamia Nuts Consuming even just a small handful of macadamia nuts can cause extreme distress to your dog, resulting in weakness, muscle tremors and joint pain. The toxicity can quickly become fatal, so do your best to prevent your dog from having access to them.

Onions, Garlic, Chives Onions, garlic and chives can cause gastrointestinal irritation and can lead to red blood cell damage. Although cats are even more susceptible, dogs can also be affected if exposed to concentrated forms of onion or garlic, such as dehydrated onions, onion powder or onion soup mix.

If you suspect your dog may have eaten something dangerous, do not wait to seek veterinary care. The sooner your four-legged family member can be properly treated, the better the outcome will be.

dangerous-foods-dogs

Cat Health- Take A Closer Look

Cats have a reputation as low-maintenance pets, that need very little care and do not require routine medical check-ups.  Any veterinarian would disagree and would urge cat parents to take a closer look at their cat’s health- and remember, that preventative care is the best care.

What’s largely happening is not that our cats are fending for themselves — as so many people assume — but rather that because they’re so good at hiding signs of illness, we don’t realize how sick they are until they’re very sick indeed.  The most common “obvious” cat aliments are abscesses, a limp or a chronic cough, but it is important to have routine physicals to identify and prevent other life-threatening issues the cats’ owners hadn’t even noticed.

“Chronic” Doesn’t Mean “Untreatable”
Ongoing problems with your cat’s health sometimes start slowly and get worse over time. In other words, these issues can creep up on you, so you may not pay much attention to them, or the issue may be overlooked entirely. That’s why you need to step back and look at your cat.  Are you ignoring chronic health issues that are making your cat miserable? Are you sure you aren’t?

If your cat hasn’t seen a veterinarian in a while, it’s time to schedule that comprehensive exam. And take heart: For every one of these often chronic conditions there are things that can be done to stop, treat or even reverse the damage. All you need to do is recognize the problem and work with your veterinarian for your cat’s better health.

obese pets3Did You know:

54% of cats in the U.S. are obese or overweight according to the Association for Pet Obesity Prevention. 

Check if you pet is at a healthy weight with the EZ Vet weight kiosk.

The Human Factor in Pet Health

We can’t emphasize enough the role that our better understanding the overall needs of our companion animals to help them live better plays today. Advances in veterinary care, better education with pet owners in understanding what makes for a healthy pet and even strides in understanding animal behavior have had a hand in that.

But what it really comes down to, according to a recent study, is the human factor.

The State of Pet Health 2013 Report fleshed out some interesting findings, including how far both dogs and cats have come in recent years in terms if their longevity, how advances and availability of specific kinds of preventative care have influenced the change — even whittling down which geographic regions where they have a higher quality of health and life.

The most compelling conclusion is that spaying and neutering pets plays a huge role in extending their healthy years.

 

Spaying and neutering have benefits besides helping to address the overpopulation problem.

For both unneutered male dogs and cats, they are more likely to be hit by a car or bitten by another animal. Intact dogs also have a higher rate testicular cancer. Females that are spayed benefit from the reduced risk of life-threatening diseases like mammary cancer (especially cats) and pyrometra.

Vaccinations, parasite control and dental care are three main areas of preventative care that have made an impact. The latter has had more emphasis in recent years, and isn’t important only to promote a healthy mouth — bacteria from inflamed gums and the pockets that that result can enter the bloodstream and affect major organs, like the liver, kidneys, heart, and lungs.

The report notes that factors like dogs living indoors and in a geographic region where disease rates (like Lyme disease and heart worm) may be lower risk, seem to contribute to longer lives. States in the south have high rates of heart worm because of heat and mosquitoes. In the northeast, Lyme disease is more prevalent because of disease-carrying ticks.

Here are other highlights from the 2013 State of Health Pet report:

Average Life Span

• 11.0 years for dogs nationwide.
• 12.1 years for U.S. cats.
• Dogs in Mississippi and Alabama lived 10.1 and 10.2 years, respectively–the lowest of any states.
• Cats had the shortest life spans in Delaware and Ohio, at 10.7 and 10.9 years, respectively.
• Dogs lived the longest in Montana and South Dakota (12.4 years).
• Feline longevity was highest in Montana (14.3 years).

Health Trends
• Most common canine diagnoses: dental tartar, ear infections, excess weight, skin infections and flea infestations.
• Top-five feline diagnoses: dental calculus, excess weight, flea infestations, gingivitis and ear infections.
Almost one in four dogs and cats was overweight or obese.
• Arthritis diagnoses came at an average age of 9 for dogs and 12 for cats.
• Kidney disease was almost seven times more common in cats than dogs.
• Dental disease afflicted 91 percent of dogs and 85 percent of cats over age 3.
• The prevalence of diabetes in dogs doubled over the last five years.

Where They Live

While the medical diagnoses were remarkably uniform across the United States, a few geographic anomalies jumped out:
• Southern states such as Alabama, South Carolina and Arkansas recorded the highest prevalence of fleas on dogs.
• Fleas on cats were most common in Oregon, South Carolina and Florida.
• Dogs in Arkansas, Oklahoma and New Hampshire were most likely to have ticks.
• Cats in Eastern states such as Massachusetts, New Hampshire and Virginia were more prone to ticks.
• Heartworms were most common in dogs living in the Southeast.
• Dogs and cats in Alabama and Mississippi had the most trouble with tapeworms.

Visit an EZ Vet kiosk to monitor your pet’s health! EZ Vet- Innovative Pet Care

dog lifespan

 

cat lifespam

 

Keep Your Pet Healthy- And He’ll Keep You Healthy

ez vet-pet health
From USA Today 5-9-13

Pets don’t just make lives fuller. They may help make them longer, says an official statement from the American Heart Association.

   Owning a pet – especially a dog – seems to have heart health benefits, the group says in the statement published Thursday in the medical journal Circulation.

   “The data is most robust for people who own a dog,” says Glenn Levine, a cardiologist with Baylor College of Medicine in Houston. But he says there’s reason to believe cats and other pets are helpful, too.

   Levine led a scientific committee that reviewed the research on pets and heart health. The group says the studies are not definitive but do suggest:

• Dogs may keep owners active (with all those walks).  In one study, dog owners were 54% more likely than other adults to get recommended levels of exercise.

• Interacting with a pet can lower stress responses in the body.

• Pet ownership is associated with lower blood pressure and cholesterol levels and less obesity.

In one of the best-designed studies, Levine says, researchers compared people with borderline high blood pressure who adopted dogs with others who also wanted dogs but were randomly assigned to delay the adoptions for purposes of the study. Those who brought home their dogs saw declines in blood pressure and were less likely to see their blood pressure and heart rates rise in response to stress. A study with cats and dogs produced similar results in people with high blood pressure and high-stress occupations, he says.

Most other studies involved comparing pet owners with those who did not have pets, meaning researchers could not rule out the possibility that people who had pets were just healthier to start with.

In any case, the experts don’t recommend that people with heart health problems adopt, rescue or buy pets just for the potential heart health boost.

The main reason to get a pet should be “to give the pet a loving home” and enjoy the relationship, Levine says.

Monitor your pet’s health and weight with the EZ Vet weight kiosk.

Two locations- Allpets Emporium in Pembroke Pines and Coral Springs.

“We also not do not want someone to go out and buy a dog and then be content to sit on the couch and smoke.”

Your Pet’s Physical and Mental Well-being

Diet affects  every aspect of your dog’s physical and mental well-being. When your dog eats  low-quality food and treats, he’s not just consuming empty calories, which packs  on pounds; his body is being robbed of the building blocks necessary to maintain  good health, energy and an upbeat attitude. Feeding good quality food and treats  helps keep Fido’s waistline in check and increase his quality and quantity of  life.

Your dog can’t read labels or  ask questions; he’s relying on you to make intelligent choices for him. Once you  learn to decipher labels, you may be surprised or shocked at what you  see.
For instance, the length of the ingredient list doesn’t  always indicate the quality of the food. A protein from a specified animal  should be the first ingredient. Avoid generic proteins such as “meat” or  “poultry.” Although dogs like to eat some of the animal parts we don’t, proteins  from a specified animal are better than byproducts. Likewise, byproducts are  better than rendered meals.

Always buy the best food you can  afford. When a manufacturer uses cheap ingredients, it has to bulk up the food  with fillers to meet the government’s minimum nutritional requirements. As a  result, the portion size for cheap food is typically larger than for  more-expensive food with higher-quality, more-digestible ingredients.

In the end, you’ll be buying more of the cheaper food, which usually  works out to be more expensive than buying the higher-quality food in the first  place. Just as with humans, obesity is a growing problem for dogs. Limit table  scraps; they’re fattening, and some human food, such as chocolate, grapes,  onions, garlic, bones and Xylitol, is dangerous for dogs.

fat pets