Pet Info

Caring for your prrrfect pet: Feline veterinary care explained

EZ Vet_ veterinarian

 

 

We all know that preventing disease or catching it in its early stages is far better than treating it once it has had time to progress to a more severe stage. Preventive health care on a regular basis will help you do just that, and save you and your pet from needless suffering and a larger financial burden. This article explains what preventive measures you can take to keep your cat healthy.

 

 

 

 

ANNUAL PHYSICAL EXAM

Just as annual physical exams are recommended for humans, they are recommended for our pets as well. If your cat is older or has medical problems, he may need even more frequent examinations. A year is a long time in a cat’s life. Assuming our cats will live to their early or middle teens, receiving a yearly exam means they will only have about thirteen exams in a lifetime. That is not very many when you think about it.

Important health concerns to discuss with your veterinarian:

  • Vaccination status and potential for exposure to disease (i.e., indoor or outdoor cat)
  • Parasite control for intestinal parasites, fleas, ticks, mites, and heartworms
  • Dental health – care you give at home; any mouth odors, pain, or other signs of disease you may have observed
  • Nutrition – including what your cat eats, how often, what supplements and treats are given, and changes in water consumption, weight or appetite
  • Exercise – how much exercise your cat receives including how often and what kind; and any changes in your cat’s ability to exercise
  • Ears and Eyes – any discharge, redness, or itching
  • Stomach and intestines – any vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, gas, belching, or abnormal stools
  • Breathing – any coughing, shortness of breath, sneezing, or nasal discharge
  • Behavior – any behavior problems such as inappropriate elimination, aggression, or changes in temperament
  • Feet and legs – any limping, weakness, toenail problems
  • Coat and skin – any hair loss, pigment changes, lumps, itchy spots, shedding, mats, or anal sac problems
  • Urogenital – any discharges, heats, changes in mammary glands, urination difficulties or changes, neutering if it has not already been performed
  • Blood tests – especially for geriatric cats, those with medical problems, and those who are receiving medications

 

VACCINATIONS

How often?

Consult with your veterinarian to determine which vaccinations your cat should receive, and how often.

You may have heard about the current controversies regarding vaccinating cats. Some researchers believe we do not need to vaccinate annually for most diseases. But how often we should vaccinate for each specific disease in adult animals has not yet been determined. We do not know how long the protection from a vaccine lasts. It may be 5 years for one disease and 3 years for another, and less than 2 years for another.

Almost all researchers agree that for kittens we need to continue to give at least three combination vaccinations and repeat these at one year of age. They also agree that rabies vaccinations must continue to be given according to local ordinances.

Against what diseases?

Experts generally agree on what vaccines are ‘core’ vaccines, i.e., what vaccines should be given to every cat, and what vaccines are given only to certain cats (noncore). Whether to vaccinate with noncore vaccines depends upon a number of things including the age, breed, and health status of the cat, the potential exposure of the cat to an animal that has the disease, the type of vaccine, and how common the disease is in the geographical area where the cat lives or may visit.

In cats, the suggested core vaccines are feline panleukopenia (distemper), feline viral rhinotracheitis, feline calici virus, and rabies.

If you have any questions about vaccinating your cat, the annual exam is a good time to ask your veterinarian.

 

HEARTWORM TESTING

When and how often pets should be tested for heartworm infection is also a matter of debate. In making a decision on when to test, we must consider how common heartworm disease is where the pet lives, what heartworm preventive the pet is receiving, and how long the mosquito season lasts.

Cats should be tested before they are started on a heartworm preventive. Experts do not agree on how often a cat that is taking a preventive should be tested, however, it would be based on risk of exposure and consistency of administering preventives. Consult with your veterinarian to determine what is best for your cat.

 

CONTROL OF INTESTINAL PARASITES

As with vaccinations and heartworm testing, you will find different opinions on when or if fecal examinations should be performed and when or if cats should receive regular “dewormings.” Decisions on testing and worming should be based on circumstances such as:

  • The age of your cat
  • The likelihood your cat is exposed to feces from other animals
  • Whether your cat has fleas
  • Whether your cat hunts
  • Whether your cat is on a heartworm preventive that also controls intestinal parasites
  • If your cat has been previously infected
  • If you plan to breed your female cat
  • If there are children who play with the cat

Regular deworming is recommended by the American Association of Veterinary Parasitologists (AAVP), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the Companion Animal Parasite Council (CAPC).

Kittens* – Because prenatal infections do not occur in kittens, initiate treatment at 3 weeks; repeat at 5, 7, and 9 weeks of age, and then put on a monthly heartworm preventive that also controls intestinal parasites. Using a year-round heartworm preventive/intestinal parasite combination product decreases the risk of parasites.

Nursing Dams- Treat at the same time as kittens.

Adult Cats- If on a year-round heartworm preventive/intestinal parasite combination product, have a fecal test performed 1-2 times per year and treat appropriately. If not on a year-round heartworm preventive/intestinal parasite combination product, have a fecal test performed 2-4 times per year and treat appropriately. Also monitor and eliminate parasites in pet’s environment.

 

Newly Acquired Animals

Worm immediately, after 2 weeks, and then follow above recommendations.

Roundworms and hookworms of cats can cause serious disease in people, especially children who may not have good hygiene habits. Treating your cat for worms is important for your pet’s health as well as your own.

Many veterinarians would agree that at a minimum, animals should have an annual fecal examination performed. Fecal examinations are advantageous. By having a fecal examination performed, you will know if your cat has intestinal parasites. If she does, you may need to change her environment and access to other animals. You will also know what type of parasites she has so the proper medication will be selected to kill all of them.

 

GERIATRIC OR ‘SENIOR’ SCREENING

Many veterinarians are starting to recommend screening tests for our older pets. Just as we have our cholesterol and blood pressure checked more often as we grow older, it is suggested our older pets need some routine checks too. Diabetes mellitus, kidney disease, and some hormonal diseases occur much more frequently in older animals. To test for these conditions and identify them before severe and/or irreversible damage is done, blood tests and sometimes radiographs are helpful. An abnormal result means we can diagnose and treat the condition early. Normal results are helpful in giving us a baseline with which we can compare future results.

Many of our older animals are also on medications and may require tests to evaluate the medication level and/or potential harmful effects on various organs.

Oral health is also extremely important in our older pets, so they may require more frequent dental check-ups.

If you have an older cat, discuss these options with your veterinarian.

In summary, annual exams along with recommended blood screening, vaccinations, heartworm testing, and parasite control will help your cat live a happier and longer life.

 

 

 

 

References and Further Reading

American Heartworm Society: www.heartwormsociety.org 
Ford, R.B. Feline Vaccination Guidelines. In Bonagura, JD; Twedt, JD (eds.) Current Veterinary Therapy XIV. W.B. Saunders Co. Philadelphia, PA; 2008; 1275-1278. 
Greene, CE; Schultz, RD. Immunoprophylaxis. In Greene, CE (eds.) Infectious Diseases of the Dog and Cat, ed 3. W.B. Saunders Co. St. Louis, 2006; 1069. 
Klingborg, DJ; Hustead, DR; Curry-Galvin, EA; Gumley, NR; Henry, SC; Bain, FT; et al. AVMA Council on Biologic and Therapeutic Agents’ report on cat and dog vaccines. Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association. November 15, 2002 (Volume 221, No. 10); 1401-1407. 
Levy, J; Crawford, C; Hartmann, K; Hofman-Lehmann, R; Little, S; Sundahl, E; Thayer, V. 2008 American Association of Feline Practitioners’ feline retrovirus management guidelines. Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery. 2008; 10:300-316. 
Richards, JR et al. The 2006 American Association of Feline Practitioners Feline Advisory Panel Report, Journal of the American Veterinary Associaiton, 2006; 229(9):1405.
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EZ Vet Station “Mini-Clinics” Provide Convenient And Affordable Pet Care

ez vet stationThe demand for retail-style healthcare has EZ Vet Station thinking “inside the box”. The current focus on innovative solutions and concepts to deliver affordable, convenient and quality medical care has never been greater, and that extends to the pet care industry as well.  Answering this growing demand is EZ Vet Station, LLC which has opened another location for their “mini-clinic” style veterinary pet care stations.  Their newest location inside the Pet Supplies Plus store in Clearwater, Florida offers evening and weekend hours and walk-in appointments. The emergence of “retail healthcare”, offering medical care services inside a retail environment, is a concept that is quickly expanding in the human health care arena.  EZ Vet plans to extend this convenient and affordable health care model into the pet industry.

EZ Vet Pet Care Stations are non- emergency compact “kiosk-style” veterinary clinics staffed with licensed Veterinarians and vet assistants that can diagnose and treat a wide variety of pet medical conditions related to teeth, ears, skin, eyes, weight, digestion, diet and parasites, in addition to offering routine services such as vaccines and microchipping. EZ Vet Stations offer a wide range of diagnostic and preventive pet care services designed to keep pets healthy.  Consistent with the “mini-clinic” concept they do not offer surgery or emergency care.  The EZ Vet Station in Clearwater is the second station in Florida, the first located in the Pet Supplies Plus store in Pinellas Park, Florida.

A recent survey indicates a real need for more convenient and affordable pet health care. 57% of those surveyed expressed they postponed pet care due to the high cost of care, and 60% surveyed indicated they wait anywhere from 3 days to more than 4 weeks for a veterinary appointment.  The American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) emphasizes that a key element to a healthy pet is preventative medical care and early detection of illnesses through routine examinations with a veterinarian.  The EZ Vet Station provides an innovative solution to delivering quality routine pet exams, preventive pet care, valuable diagnostic services, and beneficial pet prescriptions, products and services- all in the convenience of a local pet store.  Veterinarian and founder of EZ Vet Station, LLC, Barry Goldberg, DVM, stated,” I believe that this will increase access to affordable and quality healthcare for thousands of pets in the local community. Helping pets live longer and healthier lives is what it’s all about.”

EZ Vet Station’s tag line is Save time! Save Money!  They support this motto by offering affordable vaccinations, examinations and diagnostic fees inside the neighborhood pet store.  They offer Wellness packages that include annual pet vaccinations, heart worm test, intestinal parasite test and preventive (round/hook worm) at reduced prices.  Save time with walk-in visits and online appointment scheduling options.  EZ Vet Station’s successful launch has clients begging for more prompting a recent announcement of plans to expand into other communities across the nation.

 

http://www.myprgenie.com/view-publication/ez-vet-station-mini-clinics-provide-convenient-and-affordable-pet-care-1?user_type=mc&ref_no=NTk4Mzcz%250A  

Pet care made easy!

What We Do To Make Pet Health Care Easy

The EZ Vet Pet Care Station brings veterinary care to you!  The EZ Vet Pet Care Station is a compact veterinary clinic at affiliated pet friendly locations, offering routine wellness care & minor non- emergency medical treatments for pets.

A trusted licensed veterinarian and vet technician will address your pet’s concerns and outline treatments and recommendations specifically tailored to your pet’s health.

You will be in and out and on with your day before you can tell Fido to “Sit”. No appointments necessary and no long stressful wait times. Just affordable, convenient & quality health care for your four-legged family member.

Howln’ Good Time!

ez vet_ miami
The EZ Vet Clinic team supports the Paws 4 You Rescue

EZ Vet had a Howln’ Good Time as a sponsor at the Howl-O-Ween Festival at Pinecrest Gardens

On October 26th, Paws 4 You Rescue led the 4th Annual Howl-O-Ween Festival at Pinecrest Gardens. Thousands of folks came out with their families, friends, and dogs (or borrowed dogs from Paws 4 You!) to raise money for homeless pets while enjoying a gorgeous fall day of food and drinks, activities, and goodies from over 50 generous vendors and sponsors

 

More pics HERE

Pet Tips: Keep the Halloween candy away from your Pets!

EZ Vet_Pet Tips_ChocolateIf your canine companion is more family member than pet, you may be in the habit of sharing the foods your family loves with him. Maybe even (accidentally or intentionally) your Halloween candy.  Although some people foods are fine in moderation, this is definitely not the case with chocolate! Chocolate can sicken and even kill dogs, and it is one of the most common causes of canine poisoning.

While the occasional chocolate chip within one cookie may not be an issue, we worry about certain types of chocolate – the less sweet and the darker the chocolate, the more toxic it is to your pet. Baker’s chocolate and dark chocolate pose the biggest problem. Other sources include chewable, flavored multi-vitamins, baked goods, or chocolate-covered espresso beans. The chemical toxicity is due to a methylxanthine (like theobromine), and results in vomiting, diarrhea, hyperactivity, inflammation of the pancreas (i.e., pancreatitis), an abnormal heart rhythm, seizures, and rarely, even death. With Halloween right around the corner, make sure your kids know to hide the stash from your dogs. (Dogs make up 95% of all our chocolate calls, as cats are usually too discriminating to eat chocolate!) In smaller dogs, even the wrappers from candy can result in a secondary obstruction in the stomach or intestines.

Threat to pets

It’s the dose that makes the poison! Pets that ingest a few M&Ms or 1-2 bites of a chocolate chip cookie are unlikely to develop chocolate poisoning.

  • For milk chocolate, any ingestion of more than 0.5 ounces per pound of body weight may put dogs at risk for chocolate poisoning.
  • Ingestions of more than 0.13 ounces per pound of dark or semi-sweet chocolate may cause poisoning.
  • Almost all ingestions of baker’s chocolate can result in poisoning and are considered emergencies.
  • Very young, geriatric and animals with underlying disease must be treated more conservatively as they are more at risk for poisoning than healthy adult animals.
  • Due to the large amount of fat in chocolate, some pets may develop pancreatitis (inflammation of the pancreas) after eating chocolate or baked goods containing chocolate (see fatty foods).

Signs of chocolate poisoning

Ingestions of small amounts of chocolate may cause mild vomiting and diarrhea. Larger ingestions can cause severe agitation, tachycardia (elevated heart rate), abnormal heart rhythms, tremors, seizures and collapse.

Treatment

Induce vomiting and give multiple doses activated charcoal to decontaminate. Aggressive IV fluids to help with excretion, sedatives to calm the pet, specific heart medications to reduce the heart rate and blood pressure, anti-convulsants for seizures, antacids (such as Pepcid) for stomach discomfort and diarrhea. Theobromine may be reabsorbed across the bladder wall so a urinary catheter or frequent walks are needed to keep the bladder empty.

If your pet accidentally eats chocolate please contact your veterinarian immediately.

Or you can contact the Pet Poison Helpline for assistance:

Pet Poison Helpline: 1-800-213-6680

Email: info@petpoisonhelpline.com

24/7 Animal Poison Control Center

This Pet Tip is brought to you by:

EZ Vet Clinic

12035 South Dixie Hwy.  Pinecrest, FL 33156

305-255-7838  www.ezvetclinic.com

Track or Treat

Track or Treat will be held on Halloween day at Evelyn Greer Park.  EZ Vet and other local businesses will be set up around the track providing treats to all ghosts, goblins and friends.  What a great, safe alternative to traditional trick or treating.  Please bring a trick-or-treat bag!  There will be a bounce house and haunted house.

Click HERE for more details

track or treat ez vet

Track or Treat

Evelyn Greer Park

Sunday, October 31, 2010

5:00 – 7:00pm

8200 SW 124 Street

Pinecrest, FL

FREE!

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EZ Vet Howl O Ween Event

ez vet pet event

 

Come join us October 26th for a HOWL-O-ween event!

Free treats for all from EZ Vet Clinic!

Click HERE for more details

https://plus.google.com/b/103841362821753418882/events/c2nedut142n6o1376uq8qvqha9k

 

EVENT:
4th Annual Howl-O-Ween at Pinecrest Gardens
$5 Admission (Under 2 Years Old Free) Paid to Pinecrest Gardens (Includes Splash Zone)
Dogs Welcome

 

EVENT DETAILS:
- Dogs Welcome
- Doggie Fun Zone(TM) What’s this? Click here.
- Vendors Who’s gonna be there? Click here.
- Food & Drinks
- Beer & Wine Bar
- Trick-or-Treating
- Arts & Crafts
- Story Telling
- Howl-O-Ween Portraits
- Costume Contests & Parades
- Live Entertainment
- Giveaways
- Celebrity Costume Judges Dan Le Batard, Gonzalo Le Batard, and LEBO
- Adoptable Dogs from Paws 4 You Rescue
- Proceeds from Sponsors, Concessions, and Activities Benefit Homeless Pets

 

WHEN:

Sunday, October 26, 2014
12:00 PM – 5:00 PM


WHERE:
Pinecrest Gardens 
11000 Red Road
Pinecrest, FL 33156

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EZ Vet Pet Care- Temperature

Pets can’t tell us when they are not feeling well.  That is why it is important to monitor your pets temperature. An increased temperature is an important indicator of infection or illness.  The normal temperature range for adult dogs and cats is around 99.5-102.5° F.  If your pet has an increased temperature you should seek medical attention from your veterinarian.

 

Examining Your Pet’s Care

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Is your pet getting a thorough examination?

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The best way to evaluate the health of a pet is to capture their vital results.  This includes blood pressure, pulse oximetry, temperature, weight, heart rate and rhythm, and examine inside the ears, mouth and eyes. This should be done at least twice a year in order to prevent and treat any medical issues.

ez vet station (2)
ez vet station_ez vet station_otoscope

 

Vet Technician Appreciation Week

We know how important veterinarians are to the health of our pets, but not as many know about “Veterinary Technicians” and the important role that they perform.

October 12-18 is National Veterinary Technician Week – a week set aside by the veterinary profession to recognize and celebrate these important team members.

Thank you to the amazing vet technicians at EZ Vet Clinic!
Thank you to the amazing vet technicians at EZ Vet Clinic!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

EZ Veterinary Clinic Address:12035 South Dixie Highway Miami, FL 33156
Radius:

Pet Health: Back to School Blues

pet health miami

The end of the summer means a lot of changes for each member of your household, even your pet. With kids going back to school and moms and dads going back to work after vacation, many families’ schedules completely change this time of year. And vets say it’s normal for your cat or dog to exhibit some signs of depression, or back-to-school blues.

Animal experts say that you can avoid destructive behaviors when a schedule change happens in your home by ensuring your pet is kept busy while no one is home. For dogs this may mean buying some new toys that will stimulate them throughout the day or hiding treats in different rooms of your home. New toys may also help make the transition easier for your feline friends.

Dog owners may also consider hiring a dog walker to play with their pet during the day or enrolling him in a doggie daycare program. These programs help keep canines engaged and active while their owners are at work. And, just like a childcare center, you drop him off before work and pick him up afterwards.

Remembering to set aside some time in the morning and at night to play with your cat or dog is always important, especially when your family’s schedule has changed.

Pet Health Tips brought to you by: EZ Vet Pet Health Care Center

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Pet survival of the fittest

pet care_ ez vet pet clinic miami

You notice every little thing your pet does – but did you know that dogs and cats have evolved to hide illness? Showing weakness makes an animal – and their pack – vulnerable, so our best friends do everything they can to keep a stiff upper lip. Your vet can find problems your pet hides – another reason why annual checkups are so important!

Vist EZ Vet Pet Health Care Center for your pet’s annual exam

Are you a Pet Owner or a Pet Parent?

A recent article in Pshychology Today by Stanley Coren, PhD referred to a recent online survey by Kelton Research.

Of 1,000 people tested, more people are considering their dogs as part of their family and are also referring to them as children. Here are some of the results:

  • Nearly 60 percent say that their dogs play a different role than the dogs of their childhood
  • 54 percent call themselves “pet parents” instead of “pet owners”
  • 58 percent have nicknames for themselves, such as “mommy” and “daddy”
  • 35 percent call their dog their “son” or “daughter”
  • 62 percent of the dogs have their own chair, sofa, or bed
  • 81 percent of dog parents know their pets’ birthdays
  • 77 percent have celebrated their pets’ birthday by buying him or her a birthday present
  • 23 percent of pet parents have a photo album dedicated to only pictures of their dogs
  • 16 percent have started scrapbooks for their pets
  • 71 percent of pet owners admit that they have at least one picture of their dog that they carry with them

pet parent“Veterinarians once characterized as the mechanics of livestock, are now considered the pediatricians of fur babies.”

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Toxic Food Guide For Pets You Must Read

pet tipsWhat Not to Feed Dogs and Cats

Dogs and cats are curious by nature, particularly when it comes to food. They’re also very good at begging for a taste of whatever we may be eating or cooking. As cute as they may be, though, our pets can’t always stomach the same foods as us — some food can be toxic and even deadly to their health.

Use this toxic food list as a guide to preventing accidental toxic exposure to your four-legged companion.

Wine
Alcohol

Alcohol is rapidly absorbed into the bloodstream and affects pets quickly. Ingestion of alcohol can cause dangerous drops in blood sugar, blood pressure and body temperature. Intoxicated animals can experience seizures and respiratory failure. Desserts containing alcohol or yeast-containing dough are often the unknown culprits.

Coffee

Caffeine

Coffee, tea, energy drinks, dietary pills or anything containing caffeine should never be given to your pet, as they can affect the heart, stomach, intestines and nervous system. Symptoms include restlessness, hyperactivity, muscle twitching, increased urination, excessive panting, increased heart rate and blood pressure levels and seizures.

Chocolate

Chocolate

Different types of chocolate contain various levels of fat, caffeine and the substances methylxanthines. In general, the darker and richer the chocolate (i.e., baker’s chocolate), the higher the risk of toxicity. Depending on the type and amount of chocolate ingested, dogs may experience vomiting, diarrhea, urination, hyperactivity, heart arrhythmias, tremors and seizures.

Fatty foods

Fatty Foods

Foods that are high in fat can cause vomiting and diarrhea. Pancreatitis often follows the ingestion of fatty meal in dogs. Certain breeds like miniature schnauzers, Shetland sheepdogs, and Yorkshire terriers appear to be more susceptible to a bout of pancreatitis than other breeds. Fight the temptation to share fast food leftovers, junk food or foods cooked in grease with your dog.

Fat trimmings and bones

Fat Trimmings and Bones

Table scraps often contain meat fat that a human didn’t eat and bones. Both are dangerous for dogs. Fat trimmed from meat, both cooked and uncooked, may cause pancreatitis in dogs. And, although it seems natural to give a dog a bone, a dog can choke on it. Bones can also splinter and cause an obstruction or lacerations of your dog’s digestive system.

Peaches, Raisins, Persimmons, Plums and Grapes

Fruit Toxins

The specific problem with persimmons, peaches, and plums are the seeds or pits. The seeds from persimmons can cause inflammation of the small intestine in dogs. They can also cause intestinal obstruction, a good possibility if a dog eats the pit from a peach or plum. Plus, peach and plum pits contain cyanide, which is poisonous to both humans and dogs should the pit be broken open and consumed.

According to Pet Poison Helpline, grapes and raisins have been known to cause acute renal (kidney) failure in dogs. With kidney failure, a pet’s ability to produce urine decreases, which means they are unable to filter toxins out of their system.

Unfortunately, the reason for kidney failure and the amount of grapes/raisins necessary to be toxic to pets is unknown, so all cases of ingestion have the potential to be grave. Depending on the size of the dog, as little as four grapes/raisins can have an adverse effect on your fuzzy friend.

Dairy products

Milk and Dairy Products

It may be tempting on a hot day to share your ice cream cone with your dog; however, milk and milk-based products can cause diarrhea and other digestive issues because adult dogs are deficient in lactase necessary for digestion of milk. Ask your veterinarian for safe alternatives.

 Mushrooms

Mushrooms

Wild mushrooms — which may be found growing in your backyard or on the nature trail where you walk your dog — contain toxins that will trigger numerous organ systems, including the kidneys, liver and brain. Nervous system abnormalities, seizures, coma, vomiting, and death can all result when a dog consumes mushrooms.

Nutmeg

Nutmeg

Nutmeg can also be stored in the pantry with other potentially hazardous substances for pets. Often used as a spice for baking, nutmeg’s rich, spicy scent is attractive to dogs. High levels can be fatal. Signs include tremors, seizures and nervous system abnormalities.

Mixed nuts

Nuts

Abundant in many cookies and candies, certain nuts should not be given to pets. Almonds, non-moldy walnuts and pistachios can cause an upset stomach or an obstruction of your dog’s throat and/or intestinal tract; macadamia nuts and moldy walnuts can cause toxic poisonings. Moldy walnuts can contain toxic chemical products produced by fungi which cause seizures or neurological signs. Lethargy, vomiting and loss of muscle control are among the effects of nut ingestion.

Onions and garlic

Onions and Garlic

Onions contain an ingredient called thiosulphate which is toxic to cats and dogs. The ingestion of onions, onion powder, or even cooked onion causes a condition called hemolytic anemia, which is characterized by damage to the red blood cells. In other words,onion toxicity can cause the red blood cells circulating through your pet’s body to burst. A small amount can be toxic to your dog or cat.

Garlic, chives, and leeks are also part of the Allium family, and are poisonous to both dogs and cats. Garlic is considered to be about five times as potent as onions, causing oxidative damage to the red blood cells as well as an upset stomach (e.g., nausea, oral irritation, drooling, abdominal pain, vomiting, diarrhea). Other clinical signs of anemia may be seen, and include lethargy, pale gums, an elevated heart rate, an increased respiratory rate, weakness, exercise intolerance, and collapse. Onion and garlic poisoning may have a delayed onset, and clinical signs may not be apparent for several days. Immediate veterinary care is recommended.

Raw eggs

Raw Eggs

Have you ever accidentally dropped an egg on the kitchen floor while your dog is nearby? Be careful: there are two problems with allowing your dog to eat raw eggs. First: your dog could possibly get food poisoning from bacteria like Salmonella or E. coli. Second: excessive consumption of raw eggs may result in biotin deficiency that can cause skin problems and affect your dog’s coat. Feeding your dog cooked eggs is a safer bet.


Raw meat and fish

Raw Meat and Fish

Raw meat and raw fish, like raw eggs, can contain bacteria that causes food poisoning. Certain kinds of fish such as salmon, trout, shad, or sturgeon can contain a parasite that causes “fish disease.” If not treated, the disease can be fatal within 2 weeks. The first signs of illness are vomiting, fever, and big lymph nodes. Thoroughly cooking the fish will kill the parasite and protect your dog.

Rhubarb

Rhubarb

Rhubarb, a vegetable, contains oxalates which trigger abnormalities with the nervous system, kidneys and digestive tract.

Rhubarb is commonly used in recipes for pies, jams, jellies, sauces and juice.

Salt

Salt

Believe it or not, common table salt is poisonous to your pet—but it’s not usually from table scraps. The source is often what surprises pet owners: pets often experience salt toxicity as a result of eating household play dough, swallowing too much ocean salt water or ingesting paint balls, which are loaded with salt. Salt toxicity can be very severe and results in neurologic signs such as poor coordination, seizures and brain swelling, and needs to be treated carefully by a veterinarian.

Trident gum with xylitol sweetener

Xylitol

Xylitol is a sugar substitute commonly used in toothpastes, mouthwash, sugarless gum, certain cough medicines and children’s chewable multi-vitamins. It also used in many baked goods and candies. This product is recommended for diabetics and those following a low-carbohydrate diet. However, xylitol is extremely dangerous to your dog.

Ingestion of the product will cause the rapid release of insulin in dogs and result in hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemia results in vomiting, weakness, and sometimes seizures. In some cases, xylitol poisoning can result in liver failure. As little as one stick of xylitol gum could be toxic to a 20-pound dog.

Yeast dough

Yeast Dough

Unbaked dough that contains yeast can expand in your pet’s stomach or intestines. As the yeast ferments, it releases gases, resulting in nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and even life-threatening bloat and a twisted stomach. Some yeast dough also ferments into alcohol, which contributes to signs of lethargy and alcohol toxicity.

If you have concerns that your pet may have consumed a toxic substance, please contact your veterinarian or the Pet Poison Helpline* immediately.

EZ Vet Pet Health Care Center 12035 South Dixie Highway, Pinecrest, FL 33156   Office: 305-255-7838

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EZ Vet Pet Health Care Center- Miami’s Swanky Veterinary Hospital

Not Your Typical Veterinary Hospital- Concierge Service and Free Vaccines For Life

ez vet pet health care center miamiEZ Vet Pet Health Care Center, Miami Florida

There’s a new home for well-known Miami Veterinarians: Dr. Maria Diaz, Dr. Arianne Velez and Dr. Rafael Stredel at the EZ Vet Pet Health Care Center located in (Miami) Pinecrest, Florida. They will be hosting a Grand Opening event on August 10, 2014 from 12 to 2pm and invite the community to see what makes the EZ Vet Pet Health Care Center in Miami so unique.

The team at EZ Vet Pet Health Care Center is committed to making pet health easy for clients and pets alike.  Recognizing that pets are an important member of the family, EZ Vet’s wide range of services and amenities provide optimal care solutions for those furry family members.  The team of experienced Veterinarians and veterinary technicians have long been practicing in the Miami Dade and Broward County communities and offer a combined 100 years of pet care expertise.

This is no ordinary vet clinic. When you walk into the clinic you will feel like you are in the lobby of a swanky hotel.   Complimentary café station, sleek art deco décor, and no smelly pet odors here. The clinic is located at 12035 South Dixie Highway in Pinecrest, FL at the corner of S. Dixie Highway and 120th (in dental building). They are open Monday through Saturday and offer early morning pet drop off, evening and walk-in appointments.

Taking quality care and service to a new level. The beautiful facility offers state-of-the art services and amenities including an interactive pet weight analysis station and virtual and digital technology. For busy pet parents, they offer a truly convenient and unique Concierge Service that includes unlimited pet pick-up and delivery, food and medicine shipping, and a veterinary help hotline. They also offer tremendous value and savings for pet owners with their “Free Vaccines for Life Program”.

Full range of veterinary services offered at the EZ Vet Pet Health Care Center:

  • General Veterinary Care
  • Pet Preventive Medicine (i.e. vaccines, parasite control and prevention, heart worm prevention, flea and tick prevention and other)
  • Pet Dental Prophylaxis and Treatment
  • Pet Dermatology
  • Pet Laser Therapy
  • Pet Emergency Care (During Operating Hours)
  • Pet Concierge Service offering Door to Door Pick up and Drop off
  • 24/7 Veterinary Professional Hotline
  • Trupanion and Care Credit for veterinary care financing

EZ Vet Pet Health Care Center of Miami invites all pets and pet owners to their Grand Opening celebration on August 10, 2014.  Address: 12035 South Dixie Highway in Pinecrest, FL, 33156.  For additional information please call 305-255-7838 or email info@ezvet.com.

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August is Pet Vaccination Awareness Month

What Vaccines Does Your Pet Need And When?

Both dogs and cats have set vaccination schedules recommended by veterinary professionals. You may notice that a few vaccinations, such as those for rabies and DHPP, tend to be repeated in the vaccination schedule throughout the years. This is because these diseases tend to be quite powerful and your dog can constantly be exposed to them without consistent, proper vaccination.  

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Pet Vaccinations:

Pet vaccinations were originally designed to protect pets from diseases that were common at the time, which included canine distemper, canine parvo, and feline panleukopenia. Since the introduction of these vaccines, the listed diseases have become extremely rare and almost non-existent in the modern age. Current vaccinations target rabies more than any other disease since this tends to be the most common affliction among pets of all types. The ultimate goal is to make rabies as obsolete.

New Pet Owners:

New pet owners may be intimidated by the prospect of regular vaccinations for their pet. But in all actuality, the process is relatively simple and easy to adapt to your pet’s regular health routine. In terms of cost, vaccinations do tend to add up and may be a slight strain for pet owners on a budget. However, this cost is minuscule compared to the price you might otherwise have to pay to treat a disease your pet contracted as a result of not getting the vaccines. Not to mention, regular vaccinations takes a lot of stress off of you in worrying about your pet’s health or taking extra precautions to prevent exposure.

Free Vaccines For Life from EZ Vet Pet Health Care Center

It is very important to take your new puppy or kitten for their first set of vaccines between 6-8 weeks of age to protect against several common deadly viruses. With the EZ Vet Free Vaccines For Life program, for less than $160 (one time fee) your pet will have vaccines for the rest of his/her life.  Prevention is the key! Call or come by for more information.  Office: 305-255-7838  12035 S. Dixie Hwy. Pinescrest, FL 331556

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EZ Vet Pet Health Care Center- Pinecrest Pet Clinic

NOW OPEN! EZ Vet Pet Health Care Center Miami 12035 South Dixie Highway Pinecrest, FL 33156

Office: 305-255-7838   www.ezvetpethealthcarecenter.com

Monday- Thursday 8am-7pm     Friday 8am- 5pm     Saturday 9am-2pm

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What To Ask Your Vet

It’s important to talk to your vet about what you can do to keep your best friend happy and healthy. Here are some questions to ask at your next checkup. And remember, if you ever have a specific question or concern about your pet’s health, an EZ Vet Veterinarian is happy to answer your questions.

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  • Is my dog at the right weight?
  • Is it time for a dental cleaning?
  • What vaccinations does my dog need?
  • Are there things I can do to keep my dog even healthier?
  • What’s the best way to deal with fleas, ticks and other parasites?

 

Learn more about EZ Vet services. CLICK HERE

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Fat Cat Tuesday

fat cat tuesday

It’s Fat Cat Tuesday! 

Is your cat fat?  Overweight and actually obese cats outnumber cats of normal weight and are being seen more and more commonly by veterinarians for various disorders. In fact, obesity in cats can predispose the cat to diabetes, hepatic lipidosis and arthritis.

Ideal Weights of Cat Types
Domestic Cat 8-10 lbs.
Persian 7-12 lbs.
Siamese 5-10 lbs.
Maine Coon 10-25 lbs.

 

 

4 great tips to keep your pet healthy

Keep your Furry Friend Healthy and Happy with these 4 Tips

Having a pet is like having a furry member of the family. We give them food, shelter, toys, and they love us back. But, like their owners, each animal has different needs. There are, however, a few things that every pet has in common, whether it meows, neighs, or barks. These 4 tips will help you keep any furry friend healthy and happy.

Overall Health
The #1 way to keep your furry friend healthy is to make sure it has all of its vaccinations. All different types of animals require different vaccines. Some, like heartworm, are common to all animals, but have different dosages depending on weight and species. The best way to ensure that your pet is properly vaccinated is to visit your vet.

Food and Nutrition
Another way to keep your pet as healthy and happy as possible is to make sure he or she is getting proper nutrition. Talking about your pet’s age and activity level with your vet will help you and your vet make sure your fuzzy friend gets the right balance of nutrients he or she needs. Equally important to getting proper nutrition is making sure your pet is at a healthy weight.  Just like humans, weighing your pet regularly serves as important health indicator of your pet’s health.  Overweight or a sudden weight decrease can be a sign of a serious underlying health issue for your pet.  It is recommended to weigh your pet at least twice a month.  EZ Vet pet weight kiosk offers a free pet weight analysis making weighing your pet easy and convenient.

Activity and Exercise
A third tip for keeping your furry friend healthy is proper exercise. All pets, big or small, need exercise. The type of exercise depends on the type of pet. For example, in dogs, exercise helps stimulate their minds, which helps avoid boredom and destructive behaviors. Cats need imaginary prey to chase and stalk as well as scratching posts. Regardless of what kind of furry friend you have, exercise will keep your pet trim and fit, both mentally and physically.

Check for Disease
Keep an eye out for ear mites and other illnesses. They are a common problem for cats and dogs especially. If your pet is constantly shaking its head or scratching its ears, then he or she might have ear mites. These can be spread from animal to animal, and may require being thoroughly cleaned out before medication is prescribed. Check for any irregular behavior that could indicate disease.

Every human life is enriched by having an animal companion. From the unconditional love they give us, to the constant support, the benefits of having a pet are tremendous. Following these 4 tips, and regular visits to the vet, will guarantee that you and your pet have a long and happy life together.

 

Ten tips for feeding your pet

Pets, just like humans, have different tastes, allergies, and sensitivities to foods. With the growing obesity epidemic in the US, it’s important to pay close attention to what our pets are eating on a daily basis and it all starts at the pet food dish.

Here are a few tips for pet feeding:

  1. Choose a nutritionally balanced pet food. Be sure to check the ingredients on the label and try to avoid foods with fat listed within the first four ingredients. Speak with your veterinarian for suggestions of good foods.
  2. Moisten your cat’s food. According to a 2010 study at the Waltham Center in the UK, cats on moistened diets (even if it’s just adding water to their kibble) tended to be more active and weighed less.
  3. Check for allergies or intolerance. If you recently brought home a new pet or are switching your pet’s current food, it is important to monitor them on their new diet to make sure they don’t have any allergies or tummy aches caused by the food.
  4. Measure your pet’s meals. Free-pouring or “eyeing” the amount of food you feed your pet can make a big difference over time. Be sure to use measuring cups or a scoop with marked measurements so that you can be consistent and ensure that you’re not overfeeding.
  5. Determine whether you are feeding the correct amount of food. At your next veterinary check-up, ask your vet if your dog or cat is too thin or too fat to ensure that you are feeding the proper amount.
  6. Be consistent. Frequently changing the brand or type of pet food can upset your pet’s tummy so it’s important to generally stick to the same food, prepared the same, each day. If you decide to change foods, it should be done gradually by mixing in small amounts with your pet’s current food.
  7. Watch the treat intake. Pet treats can be high in calories and quickly add up. Be sure to moderate the amount of treats given to your pet each day.
  8. Take exercise into consideration. Did you recently start a new jogging routine with your dog? Are your kids spending more time playing with the cats? If your pet’s exercise habits have changed, it might also be time to adjust his food intake.
  9. Age is a factor. As your dog or cat gets older, his metabolism (and likely activity level) slow down. Be sure to take your pet’s age into consideration when choosing a food (is it time for a senior diet?) and the size of the scoop.
  10. All pets are different. Each pet has its own nutritional needs based on his individual age, breed, activity level, lifestyle, etc. so be sure to look at each pet as an individual when determining their food needs.

Original Article

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Featured dog breed- American Foxhound

 Featured Breed: American Foxhound

One of America’s native breeds, the  American Foxhound is also one of our rarest. This tall hound sports a close, hard  coat that can be any color. The Foxhound in this country is used for four  purposes, thus calling for hounds of a different characteristics: competitive field  trial hounds and “trail” hounds (speed is most important), fox hunting hounds  (slow workers with good voices), and pack hounds (15 to 20 hounds or more, used  by hunt clubs and farmers).

 

Healthy Weight for : American Foxhound

Adult (7 months- 8 years):        Male: 40-65 lbs.               Female: 40-65 lbs.

Puppy (1-6 months):                  Male:  30-48.75 lbs         Female: 30-48.75 lbs

Geriatric (over 8 years):            Male: 42-68.25 lbs          Female: 42-68.25 lbs

American-Foxhound dog breeds

 

 

 

by EZ Vet pet kiosk

EZ Vet is your companion to a healthy pet!

Visit an EZ Vet kiosk regularly to monitor your pet’s weight and health.

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Pet obesity tied to major health issues

Pet Health: The statistics are staggering. A 2012 veterinary survey by the Association for Pet Obesity Prevention revealed 52.5 percent of pet dogs and 58.3 percent of cats are overweight. That equates to 80 million pets at risk for weight-related disorders including diabetes, arthritis, hypertension, several cancers and a shortened life.

Another startling discovery was that 45 percent of owners were stunned when a veterinarian said their pet was overweight. They simply don’t see it.

Too much food, along with tasty tidbits from human meals compromises any pet’s health. The same can be said for humans. In fact, overweight owners, in my unscientific observation, are more likely to over feed their pets.

pet-obesity 4Certain breeds showed greater risk for excess weight. Of the nearly 1,500 dogs in the survey, 58.9 percent of Labrador retrievers and a whopping 62.7 percent of golden retrievers were classified as overweight or obese.

It has been reported that veterinarians continue to see an escalation in the number of overweight cats and an explosion in Type 2 diabetes cases.

He further says he sees a clear connection between pet and childhood obesity rates. “The causes are largely the same: too many high-calorie foods and snacks combined with too little physical activity. Share crunchy vegetables (such as carrots) with your dog instead of sugary, fatty treats.”

“Obesity is rampant, setting up more and more pets for joint problems during their lives, costing hundreds of millions of dollars in veterinary bills and countless surgical procedures for weight-related conditions.”

Claims filed with Veterinary Pet Insurance Co., the nation’s largest pet health insurance provider, has seen pet obesity-related claims soar. In 2012, policyholders filed more than $34 million in claims for conditions and diseases that can be caused by excess weight.

Based on its database of 485,000 insured pets, the company determined the top 5 dog and cat obesity-related conditions are:

Dogs

1.Arthritis

2.Bladder/urinary tract disease

3.Undiagnosed limp

4.Low thyroid hormone

5.Liver disease

Cats

1.Bladder/urinary tract disease

2.Chronic kidney disease

3.Diabetes

4.Asthma

5.Liver disease

Taking your pet to the veterinarian for regular wellness visits is the most effective way to monitor their weight.  Daily exercise, a regulated diet and watching for signs of weight gain are important steps toward avoiding obesity and related health issues.

As mentioned, these statistics are no laughing matter. Most pet owners don’t think twice about feeding their pet table scraps and fatty foods, but doing so increases the risk of unnecessary health problems and shortens their life expectancy.

Overfeeding a commercial diet can lead to the same issues. If I fed my Newfoundlands what the kibble bag recommends (based on weight), they’d blow up like balloons. They get approximately half, if not less, than the recommended serving size, split into two meals a day.

EZ Vet is your companion to a healthy pet!

Visit an EZ Vet kiosk regularly to monitor your pet’s weight and health.

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Pet Health- Decreasing weight means increasing concern

healthy petMost dog owners spend a significant amount of time worrying about ways to prevent their dogs from gaining weight. The opposite problem is rarely the case. When a dog does appear to be losing weight inexplicably, it is always cause for concern.

The first step toward a resolution is to go over your dog’s eating and exercise schedule. Question all members of the family about their responsibilities related to the dog’s care and feeding. Go as far as making a chart that quantifies amounts of food offered and actually consumed, and duration of and exertion during the various walks the dog is taken on. Not until the logic of this part of your dog’s daily routine has been established should you move on to further investigation.

What to Look For

Weight loss is weight loss. When it represents a threat to your dog’s health, however, it is much more of a concern. Of course, any time significant weight loss is mentioned, a thorough physical exam is called for.

For your current purposes, though, let’s focus on your dog’s immediate issues. Start evaluating your dog as a whole. Analyze his levels of energy and enthusiasm. Check his fur to see if it is sparse, coarse, or dull. Look for any loss of muscle mass. If you observe such a loss, see if it occurred in a symmetric fashion or if it is limited to certain parts of his anatomy. Check for evidence of protruding bones, especially the ridges of his skull, his shoulder blades, spinal vertebrae, ribs, and hips.

What to Do

Now go through the following questions to figure out what to do next:

  • Has your dog been ill recently? Chronic illness, especially organ system failure of the pancreas, kidney, or liver can result in long term nausea and vomiting, often leading to dramatic weight loss. If any of these conditions affect your dog, weight loss is to be expected, but not irreversible if the prognosis for the disease is optimistic.
  • Is your dog’s coat sparse, coarse, or dull? If so, it could be due to the same cause as the weight loss. If your dog’s appetite has remained healthy throughout the weight loss, intestinal parasites may be the problem. Warn your family members to practice strict personal hygiene and submit a fecal sample from your dog to your veterinarian.
  • Is your dog currently taking any medication? Either the illness your dog is being treated for or the medication he is taking for it could be a factor in his weight loss. If your veterinarian approves, try reducing or even eliminating your dog’s chronic medication to see if that helps him regain his appetite and the weight he has lost.
  • Has your dog recently suffered from any form of head trauma? If so, there is the possibility of a concussion, as well as the dizziness and nausea that go with it. These symptoms could very well result in noticeable weight loss over a relatively short period of time. Seek your vet’s help for a neurology consult.

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Do you know your dog breeds? American Eskimo Dog

Featured Breed- American Eskimo Dog

A small to medium-size  Nordic-type dog, the American Eskimo Dog is known for its bright white coat,  jet black points (lips, nose and eye rims) and erect triangular ears. Although  once used as a circus dog, they are primarily companion dogs today and  participate in conformation, obedience and agility competitions. The breed’s  white double coat consists of a short, dense undercoat, with longer guard hairs  forming an outer coat that stands off from the body.

American Eskimo dog          american-eskimo-dog

 

Healthy Weight for : Miniature Breed

Adult (7 months- 8 years):    Male: 11-20 lbs.                Female: 11-20 lbs.

Puppy (1-6 months):              Male:  8.25-15 lbs             Female: 8.25-15 lbs.

Geriatric (over 8 years):        Male:   11.55-21 lbs.          Female: 11.55- 21 lbs.

 

Healthy Weight for : Standard Breed

Adult (7 months- 8 years):    Male: 20-40 lbs.               Female: 20-40 lbs.

Puppy (1-6 months):               Male: 15-30 lbs                Female: 15-30 lbs.

Geriatric (over 8 years):         Male: 21-42 lbs.               Female: 21-42 lbs.

 

Healthy Weight for : Toy Breed

Adult (7 months- 8 years):      Male: 6-10 lbs.               Female:  6-10 lbs.

Puppy (1-6 months):                 Male: 4.5-7.5 lbs           Female: 4.5-7.5 lbs.

Geriatric (over 8 years):           Male:  6.3-10.5 lbs.       Female: 6.3- 10.5 lbs.

 

Visit an EZ Vet kiosk regularly to monitor your pet’s weight and health.

 

 

What’s weighing on your pet’s health?

When’s the last time you weighed your pet?  Like humans, it’s not unusual for your pet to sneak on a few extra pounds over the years. This extra weight can have serious implications for a pet’s overall health. That’s why it’s important to identify what your pet’s ideal weight is.  This is the basis behind a new invention by Miami veterinarian, Dr. Barry Goldberg. EZ Vet is the original pet scale kiosk that allows pet parents to evaluate if their pet is at a healthy weight, and will educate on ways to prevent pet obesity and offer solutions to correct the problem if needed.

Pet obesity is a serious issue in the United States, and growing.  Pet obesity rates continued to increase in 2012, and with the number of overweight cats reaching an all-time high. The sixth annual National Pet Obesity Awareness Day Survey conducted by the Association for Pet Obesity Prevention (APOP) found that 52.5% of dogs and 58.3% of cats to be overweight or obese by their veterinarian. That equals approximately 80 million U.S. dogs and cats at increased risk for weight-related disorders such as diabetes, osteoarthritis, hypertension and many cancers.  EZ Vet offers a convenient way to help monitor a pet’s weight to make sure they do not fall into this growing trend.

“You’d be amazed how many pet parents have no idea that their pet is overweight. They may guess their 9 pound Chihuahua is 2-3 pounds overweight and not think it’s a big deal.  But those 3 little extra pounds is approximately 33% of their body weight.  Can you image carrying around 33% extra weight? Many pet parents simply don’t know what the healthy weight range is for their pet’s breed, gender and age or understand why it is so important,” says Dr. Goldberg.   EZ Vet utilizes interactive touch-pad technology to easily gather specifics about the pet and then generates the healthy weight range.

Just like humans, extra weight and obesity similarly affect pets.  Untreated, obesity in pets can make them vulnerable to a variety of health issues such as joint problems, heart and respiratory disease, diabetes, cancer, liver disease, skin problems and heat intolerance.  With the Florida summer heat fast approaching, now is the perfect time to evaluate your pets weight and help them shed any extra weight needed. EZ Vet is conveniently located in retail stores so there is never a need for an appointment or a trip to the veterinarian’s office to have a mini-checkup on your pet.
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Do you know your dog breeds? Alaskan Malamute

Featured Breed- Alaskan Malamute

The  largest and oldest of the Arctic sled dogs, the Alaskan Malamute possesses great  strength and endurance. He is not designed to race, but rather to carry large  loads over long distances. Today, many Malamutes are family pets, but are  highly athletic and still capable of enjoying sledding, weight-pulling,  back-packing, jogging and swimming with their owners. The Malamute coat is  thick and coarse, with a plumed tail carried over the back. The coat usually  ranges in color from light gray to black or from sable to red. Face markings,  including a cap on the head and a bar/mask on the face are often distinguishing  features.

Healthy Weight for :

Adult (7 months- 8 years):       Male:  80-95 lbs.           Female:  70-85 lbs.

Puppy (1-6 months):                 Male:  60-71.25 lbs.      Female:  52.5-63.75 lbs.

Geriatric (over 8 years):           Male:  84-99.75 lbs.      Female:  73.5- 89.25 lbs.

Visit an EZ Vet kiosk regularly to monitor your pet’s weight and health.

Alaskan-MalamuteAlaskan Malamute

Tips to keep your dog safe this July 4th

dogs fireworks

More pets are lost on Independence Day than any other day. Here are some tips for keeping your dog safe!

1.) Go for a long walk before celebrating. If you normally take your dog out for thirty minutes, take a two-hour hike instead! You want your dog to be completely exhausted. This way his brain will be so tired that he won’t be able to concentrate on the fireworks.

2.) Use canine-safe ear plugs. It is natural for dogs to be afraid of loud noises. The sounds trigger their nervous system, and they may become nervous, afraid, unsure, or shy. Running away from the noise is a survival mechanism. If you can block the noise, it may curb the “flight” response.

3.) Distract your dog. Once the fireworks go off, ask him to do obedience behavior, put him on the treadmill, or strap on his backpack. This helps him focus on something other than the noise.

4.) Involve your dog’s nose. Scents such as lavender or pine can help encourage your dog to relax.

5.) Maintain calm and assertive energy. Don’t feel sorry or frustrated. Don’t blame the fireworks or the people setting them off. These negative emotions will just feed your dog’sanxiety; it won’t help the situation!

6.) Keep your dog on a leash. This will give you more control and help you prevent your dog from running off.

7.) Make sure your dog has I.D. If your dog does become lost, tags and microchips can get him back to you safely. You may also want to consider investing in a device that allows you to locate your dog immediately, like Global Pet Finder.

8.) Be proactive! If you learn that your dog is nervous around fireworks, start preparing now for next year. I recommend that you begin conditioning your dog to be comfortable with these loud sounds at least three months in advance. Don’t wait until Independence Day to introduce your dog to the loud sounds associated with fireworks. Download the sounds of firecrackers, pistols, and other loud noises, and allow your dog to hear them at a low volume while he’s eating, walking, sleeping, and watching TV with you. Gradually increase the volume each day until your dog is comfortable with the sounds at the highest level. I also recommend that you introduce the scent of fireworks to your dog, so he becomes comfortable with that. It’s a simple process, but it takes time. Don’t wait until the last minute to do something about it, and next year it will be a walk in the park!

Deadly Diet- Surprising foods you should never feed your pet

If you are like many dog owners, you may find tableside begging one of the hardest habits to break in your pet. Who can resist those big puppy dog eyes pleading for just a nibble from your plate? You should know, however, that some foods should never be shared with your dog. Some foods contain ingredients and compounds that can do more than cause a minor upset stomach; they can actually be deadly for your dog.  Here are the worst culprits you will want to avoid sharing with your furry friend:

Grapes and Raisins Although the exact toxin is unknown, grapes and raisins have been associated with kidney failure in dogs. Symptoms of grape or raisin exposure include vomiting, lethargy or diarrhea within 12 hours of ingestion. Dogs become increasingly lethargic and dehydrated, and death can occur within three to four days, so extreme care must be taken to ensure your dog never has access to grapes or raisins.

Xylitol Found in some candies and chewing gum, xylitol is a sweetener that can be deadly for your dog. When ingested, xylitol stimulates the release of insulin which can lead to hypoglycemia. Vomiting, lethargy and trouble with coordination are warning signs that should not be ignored; if left untreated, xylitol toxicity can be fatal.

Alcohol Alcoholic beverages can have the same effect on a dog as a human, but most dog breeds are smaller than the average human, making the effects much more acute. Vomiting, liver damage and brain damage can result from even a small amount of alcohol, so use care when consuming alcohol around your pet and dispose of cans and bottles safely.

Apple Core/Apricot Pits The core and pits of these fruits contain cyanogenic glycosides, which can cause cyanide poisoning in dogs. Signs of toxicity include excess salivation, dilated pupils, difficulty breathing, dizziness, collapse, coma, seizures and shock.

Avocado Avocados are toxic to a number of animals, and that includes the family dog. The toxicity comes from a compound called persin, which is found inside the avocado as well as in its skin. There are reports of damage to the heart of some dogs that have ingested sufficient quantities of avocado. The best advice is to avoid feeding your dog avocado altogether.

Chocolate, Coffee, Caffeine These foods all contain methylxanthines, which can cause vomiting, diarrhea, panting, excessive thirst and urination, hyperactivity, abnormal heart rhythm, tremors, seizures and even death. As a general rule, the darker the chocolate, the more toxic it is to pets, with powdered cocoa and dark baking chocolate being the most deadly.

Dairy Products Milk and other dairy products, though not dangerously toxic, cannot be properly digested by adult dogs because they lack the enzyme to break down lactose, the sugar found in dairy. This can lead to excess gas and diarrhea.

Macadamia Nuts Consuming even just a small handful of macadamia nuts can cause extreme distress to your dog, resulting in weakness, muscle tremors and joint pain. The toxicity can quickly become fatal, so do your best to prevent your dog from having access to them.

Onions, Garlic, Chives Onions, garlic and chives can cause gastrointestinal irritation and can lead to red blood cell damage. Although cats are even more susceptible, dogs can also be affected if exposed to concentrated forms of onion or garlic, such as dehydrated onions, onion powder or onion soup mix.

If you suspect your dog may have eaten something dangerous, do not wait to seek veterinary care. The sooner your four-legged family member can be properly treated, the better the outcome will be.

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Do you know your dog breeds? Akita

Featured Breed- Akita

Large, powerful and alert,  the Akita is a working breed that originated in Japan.  Dignified and courageous, the Akita  today is popular in the show ring and also participates in performance and  therapy work. The breed’s thick double coat can be any color including white,  brindle or pinto. An Akita trademark is the plush tail that curls over his  back.

Healthy Weight for Akita Breed:

Adult (7 months- 8 years):    Male:   85-130 lbs             Female: 65-110  lbs

Puppy (1-6 months):              Male:   63.75-97.5 lbs       Female: 48.75-82.5 lbs

Geriatric (over 8 years):        Male: 89.25-136.5 lbs       Female: 68.25-115.5 lbs

Visit an EZ Vet kiosk regularly to monitor your pet’s weight and health.

____   akita dog breed     akita2

 

Do you know your dog breeds? Airedale Terrier

Featured Breed- Airedale Terrier

The undisputed “King of  Terriers,” the Airedale Terrier is the largest and hardiest of the terriers,  and an all around useful dog. The  breed’s coat is hard, dense and wiry, with a softer undercoat, and comes in  both tan and black and tan and grizzle. This breed was one of the first used  for police duty in Germany  and Great Britain  and has also been popular with Presidents, including Woodrow Wilson, Warren  Harding and Calvin Coolidge.

Healthy Weight for Airedale Terriers:

Adult (7 months- 8 years):     Male: 50-65 lbs              Female:   40-55 lbs

Puppy (1-6 months):                Male: 37.5-48.75 lbs     Female:  30-41.25 lbs

Geriatric (over 8 years):          Male:  52.5-68.25 lbs    Female:  42-57.75 lbs

Visit an EZ Vet kiosk regularly to monitor your pet’s weight and health.

airedale terrier ______airedale-terrier

Cat Health- Take A Closer Look

Cats have a reputation as low-maintenance pets, that need very little care and do not require routine medical check-ups.  Any veterinarian would disagree and would urge cat parents to take a closer look at their cat’s health- and remember, that preventative care is the best care.

What’s largely happening is not that our cats are fending for themselves — as so many people assume — but rather that because they’re so good at hiding signs of illness, we don’t realize how sick they are until they’re very sick indeed.  The most common “obvious” cat aliments are abscesses, a limp or a chronic cough, but it is important to have routine physicals to identify and prevent other life-threatening issues the cats’ owners hadn’t even noticed.

“Chronic” Doesn’t Mean “Untreatable”
Ongoing problems with your cat’s health sometimes start slowly and get worse over time. In other words, these issues can creep up on you, so you may not pay much attention to them, or the issue may be overlooked entirely. That’s why you need to step back and look at your cat.  Are you ignoring chronic health issues that are making your cat miserable? Are you sure you aren’t?

If your cat hasn’t seen a veterinarian in a while, it’s time to schedule that comprehensive exam. And take heart: For every one of these often chronic conditions there are things that can be done to stop, treat or even reverse the damage. All you need to do is recognize the problem and work with your veterinarian for your cat’s better health.

obese pets3Did You know:

54% of cats in the U.S. are obese or overweight according to the Association for Pet Obesity Prevention. 

Check if you pet is at a healthy weight with the EZ Vet weight kiosk.

Do you know your dog breeds? Afghan Hound

Featured Pet Breed- Afghan Hound

Referred to as an  aristocrat, the Afghan Hound’s appearance is one of dignity and aloofness. Well covered with thick, silky hair, very  fine in texture, the Afghan hound’s coat is a sort found among animals native  to high altitudes. They can come in all  colors, and while the breed is an excellent hound (hunting by sight) its popularity  here has been generated by the breeds’ spectacular qualities as a show dog.

Healthy Weight for Afghan Hounds:

Adult (7 months- 8 years):      Male: 60-64 lbs.         Female: 50-55 lbs.

Puppy (1-6 months):                Male: 45-48 lbs           Female: 37.5- 41.25 lbs.

Geriatric (over 8 years):          Male:  63-67.2 lbs.     Female: 52.5- 57.75 lbs.

Visit an EZ Vet kiosk regularly to monitor your pet’s weight and health.

afgan hound_______Afghan-Hound-5

Do you know your dog breeds: Affenpinscher

Featured Dog Breed- Affenpinscher

The Affenpinscher (translated from German as Monkey-Terrier) is a peppy  dog that has the face and impish nature of a monkey. This wire-haired terrier-like breed acts like  a bigger dog as he proudly struts around. The coat of an Affenpinscher is usually black, but they also come in gray,  silver, red, belge or black and tan.

Affenpinschers have a  fun-loving, sometimes mischievous, personality. Their intelligence, appearance and attitude make them a good house pet,  but children should always be taught how to properly handle the dog. Their  small size makes them ideal for an apartment. They are very active indoors and most of their exercise needs can be met  with indoor play, but they enjoy daily walks. Their wiry coat should be brushed  and combed twice a week and trimmed twice a year.

Healthy Weight for Affenpinscher:

Adult (7 months- 8 years):    Male: 7-9 lbs.                   Female: 7-9 lbs.

Puppy (1-6 months):              Male: 5.25- 6.75 lbs        Female: 5.25- 6.75 lbs.

Geriatric (over 8 years):        Male:  7.35-9.45 lbs.       Female: 7.35- 9.45 lbs.

affenpinscher_____affenpinscher_dog

Safe Summer Tips For Your Pet

pet tips_summerWe all love spending the long, sunny days of summer outdoors with our furry companions, but being overeager in hot weather can spell danger, ASPCA experts warn.

“Most people love to spend the warmer days enjoying the outdoors with friends and family, but it is important to remember that some activities can be dangerous for our pets,” said Dr. Camille DeClementi, Senior Toxicologist at the ASPCA’s Animal Poison Control Center. “By following a few simple rules, it is easy to keep your pet safe while still having fun in the sun.”

Take these simple precautions, provided by ASPCA experts, to help prevent your pet from overheating. And if you suspect your pet is suffering from heat stroke, get help from your veterinarian immediately.

Visit the Vet
A visit to the veterinarian for a spring or early summer check-up is a must. Make sure your pets get tested for heartworm if they aren’t on year-round preventive medication. Do parasites bug your animal companions? Ask your doctor to recommend a safe flea and tick control program.

Made in the Shade
Pets can get dehydrated quickly, so give them plenty of fresh, clean water when it’s hot outdoors. Make sure your pets have a shady place to get out of the sun, be careful to not over-exercise them, and keep them indoors when it’s extremely hot.

Know the Warning Signs
Symptoms of overheating in pets include excessive panting or difficulty breathing, increased heart and respiratory rate, drooling, mild weakness, stupor or even collapse. They can also include seizures, bloody diarrhea and vomit along with an elevated body temperature of over 104 degrees. Animals with flat faces, like Pugs and Persian cats, are more susceptible to heat stroke since they cannot pant as effectively. These pets, along with the elderly, the overweight, and those with heart or lung diseases, should be kept cool in air-conditioned rooms as much as possible.

No Parking!
Never leave your animals alone in a parked vehicle. “On a hot day, a parked car can become a furnace in no time-even with the windows open-which could lead to fatal heat stroke,” says Dr. Louise Murray, Vice President of ASPCA Bergh Memorial Animal Hospital. Also, leaving pets unattended in cars in extreme weather is illegal in several states.

Make a Safe Splash   
Do not leave pets unsupervised around a pool-not all dogs are good swimmers. Introduce your pets to water gradually and make sure they wear floatation devices when on boats. Rinse your dog off after swimming to remove chlorine or salt from his fur, and try to keep your dog from drinking pool water, which contains chlorine and other chemicals that could cause stomach upset.

Screen Test
“During warmer months, the ASPCA sees an increase in injured animals as a result of High-rise Syndrome which occurs when pets-mostly cats-fall out of windows or doors and are seriously or fatally injured,” says Dr. Murray. “Pet owners need to know that this is completely preventable if they take simple precautions.” Keep all unscreened windows or doors in your home closed and make sure adjustable screens are tightly secured.

Summer Style
Feel free to trim longer hair on your dog, but never shave your dog: The layers of dogs’ coats protect them from overheating and sunburn. Brushing cats more often than usual can prevent problems caused by excessive heat. And be sure that any sunscreen or insect repellent product you use on your pets is labeled specifically for use on animals.

Street Smarts
When the temperature is very high, don’t let your dog linger on hot asphalt. Being so close the ground, your pooch’s body can heat up quickly, and sensitive paw pads can burn. Keep walks during these times to a minimum.

Avoid Chemicals
Commonly used flea and tick products, rodenticides (mouse and rat baits), and lawn and garden insecticides can be harmful to cats and dogs if ingested, so keep them out of reach. When walking your dog, steer clear of areas that you suspect have been sprayed with insecticides or other chemicals. Keep citronella candles, oil products and insect coils out of pets’ reach as well. Call your veterinarian or the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center at (888) 426-4435

Party Animals
Taking Fido to a backyard barbeque or party? Remember that the food and drink offered to guests may be poisonous to pets. Keep alcoholic beverages away from pets, as they can cause intoxication, depression and comas. Similarly, remember that the snacks enjoyed by your human friends should not be a treat for your pet; any change of diet, even for one meal, may give your dog or cat severe digestive ailments. Avoid raisins, grapes, onions, chocolate and products with the sweetener xylitol.

Fireworks Aren’t Very Pet-riotic
Please leave pets at home when you head out to Fourth of July celebrations, and never use fireworks around pets. Exposure to lit fireworks can potentially result in severe burns or trauma to curious pets, and even unused fireworks can be hazardous. Many types of fireworks contain potentially toxic substances such as potassium nitrate, copper, chlorates, arsenic and other heavy metals.

 

What is the State of Your Pet’s Health?

The rate of overweight and obese pets has reached epidemic levels in the United States, affecting approximately 1 in 4 dogs and cats.

While some may consider pets to be cuter or happier when they are overweight, the truth is, that extra weight is linked to other serious conditions such as arthritis, heart, respiratory problems and diabetes.

State of Health Report

The Human Factor in Pet Health

We can’t emphasize enough the role that our better understanding the overall needs of our companion animals to help them live better plays today. Advances in veterinary care, better education with pet owners in understanding what makes for a healthy pet and even strides in understanding animal behavior have had a hand in that.

But what it really comes down to, according to a recent study, is the human factor.

The State of Pet Health 2013 Report fleshed out some interesting findings, including how far both dogs and cats have come in recent years in terms if their longevity, how advances and availability of specific kinds of preventative care have influenced the change — even whittling down which geographic regions where they have a higher quality of health and life.

The most compelling conclusion is that spaying and neutering pets plays a huge role in extending their healthy years.

 

Spaying and neutering have benefits besides helping to address the overpopulation problem.

For both unneutered male dogs and cats, they are more likely to be hit by a car or bitten by another animal. Intact dogs also have a higher rate testicular cancer. Females that are spayed benefit from the reduced risk of life-threatening diseases like mammary cancer (especially cats) and pyrometra.

Vaccinations, parasite control and dental care are three main areas of preventative care that have made an impact. The latter has had more emphasis in recent years, and isn’t important only to promote a healthy mouth — bacteria from inflamed gums and the pockets that that result can enter the bloodstream and affect major organs, like the liver, kidneys, heart, and lungs.

The report notes that factors like dogs living indoors and in a geographic region where disease rates (like Lyme disease and heart worm) may be lower risk, seem to contribute to longer lives. States in the south have high rates of heart worm because of heat and mosquitoes. In the northeast, Lyme disease is more prevalent because of disease-carrying ticks.

Here are other highlights from the 2013 State of Health Pet report:

Average Life Span

• 11.0 years for dogs nationwide.
• 12.1 years for U.S. cats.
• Dogs in Mississippi and Alabama lived 10.1 and 10.2 years, respectively–the lowest of any states.
• Cats had the shortest life spans in Delaware and Ohio, at 10.7 and 10.9 years, respectively.
• Dogs lived the longest in Montana and South Dakota (12.4 years).
• Feline longevity was highest in Montana (14.3 years).

Health Trends
• Most common canine diagnoses: dental tartar, ear infections, excess weight, skin infections and flea infestations.
• Top-five feline diagnoses: dental calculus, excess weight, flea infestations, gingivitis and ear infections.
Almost one in four dogs and cats was overweight or obese.
• Arthritis diagnoses came at an average age of 9 for dogs and 12 for cats.
• Kidney disease was almost seven times more common in cats than dogs.
• Dental disease afflicted 91 percent of dogs and 85 percent of cats over age 3.
• The prevalence of diabetes in dogs doubled over the last five years.

Where They Live

While the medical diagnoses were remarkably uniform across the United States, a few geographic anomalies jumped out:
• Southern states such as Alabama, South Carolina and Arkansas recorded the highest prevalence of fleas on dogs.
• Fleas on cats were most common in Oregon, South Carolina and Florida.
• Dogs in Arkansas, Oklahoma and New Hampshire were most likely to have ticks.
• Cats in Eastern states such as Massachusetts, New Hampshire and Virginia were more prone to ticks.
• Heartworms were most common in dogs living in the Southeast.
• Dogs and cats in Alabama and Mississippi had the most trouble with tapeworms.

Visit an EZ Vet kiosk to monitor your pet’s health! EZ Vet- Innovative Pet Care

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Your Pet’s Weight Translated

pet weightIt’s important to realize that five pounds in a large breed dog could be the equivalent to 10 pounds in a human. Five pounds in a small breed dog could be equal to 20 pounds in a human adult. APOP calculates that a 12 pound Yorkie is the same as an average female weighing 218 pounds, and a 14 pound cat is equivalent to a 237 pound man. Did you consider that a 90 pound female Labrador retriever is equal to a 186 pound 5’ 4” female or 217 pound 5’ 9” male, or a fluffy feline that weighs 15 pounds (DSH) is equal to a 218 pound 5’ 4” female or 254 pound 5’ 9” male? What you consider just a few pounds can really be weighing on your pet!